HEDT Tech News

Cloudflare Deploys AMD EPYC Processors Across its Latest Gen X Servers

Now this is a big win for AMD … all of Cloudflare’s latest Gen X Servers will be powered by AMD’s 2nd Gen EPYC processors.

Taken from Cloudflare Blog

We designed and built Cloudflare’s network to be able to grow capacity quickly and inexpensively; to allow every server, in every city, to run every service; and to allow us to shift customers and traffic across our network efficiently. We deploy standard, commodity hardware, and our product developers and customers do not need to worry about the underlying servers. Our software automatically manages the deployment and execution of our developers’ code and our customers’ code across our network. Since we manage the execution and prioritization of code running across our network, we are both able to optimize the performance of our highest tier customers and effectively leverage idle capacity across our network.

An alternative approach might have been to run several fragmented networks with specialized servers designed to run specific features, such as the FirewallDDoS protection or Workers. However, we believe that approach would have resulted in wasted idle resources and given us less flexibility to build new software or adopt the newest available hardware. And a single optimization target means we can provide security and performance at the same time.

We use Anycast to route a web request to the nearest Cloudflare data center (from among 200 cities), improving performance and maximizing the surface area to fight attacks.

Once a datacenter is selected, we use Unimog, Cloudflare’s custom load balancing system, to dynamically balance requests across diverse generations of servers. We load balance at different layers: between cities, between physical deployments located across a city, between external Internet ports, between internal cables, between servers, and even between logical CPU threads within a server.

As demand grows, we can scale out by simply adding new servers, points of presence (PoPs), or cities to the global pool of available resources. If any server component has a hardware failure, it is gracefully de-prioritized or removed from the pool, to be batch repaired by our operations team. This architecture has enabled us to have no dedicated Cloudflare staff at any of the 200 cities, instead relying on help for infrequent physical tasks from the ISPs (or data centers) hosting our equipment.

 

Gen X: Intel Not Inside

We recently turned up our tenth generation of servers, “Gen X”, already deployed across major US cities, and in the process of being shipped worldwide. Compared with our prior server (Gen 9), it processes as much as 36% more requests while costing substantially less. Additionally, it enables a ~50% decrease in L3 cache miss rate and up to 50% decrease in NGINX p99 latency, powered by a CPU rated at 25% lower TDP (thermal design power) per core.

Notably, for the first time, Intel is not inside. We are not using their hardware for any major server components such as the CPU, board, memory, storage, network interface card (or any type of accelerator). Given how critical Intel is to our industry, this would until recently have been unimaginable, and is in contrast with prior generations which made extensive use of their hardware.

This time, AMD is inside.

We were particularly impressed by the 2nd Gen AMD EPYC processors because they proved to be far more efficient for our customers’ workloads. Since the pendulum of technology leadership swings back and forth between providers, we wouldn’t be surprised if that changes over time. However, we were happy to adapt quickly to the components that made the most sense for us.

Source: Cloudflare Blog

 

Related Articles

The Last of Us Part II Delayed Says Sony

nucleus

Memory Bandwidth of PlayStation 5 vs PS4

nucleus

Resident Evil 3 Remake Demo will be Available on March 19th

nucleus

Leave a Comment